Topical Lidocaine for Laser Hair Removal

Topical lidocaine for laser hair removal works by reversibly block nerve conduction near their site of administration, thereby producing temporary loss of sensation in a limited area. Nerve impulse conduction is blocked by decreasing nerve cell membrane permeability to sodium ions, possibly by competing with calcium-binding sites that control sodium permeability. This change in permeability results in decreased depolarization and an increased excitability threshold that, ultimately, prevents the nerve action potential from forming.

 

 

Topical Lidocaine for Laser Hair Removal

 

 

Absorption of Topical Lidocaine for Laser Hair Removal

 

 

Skin absorption is highly variable. Most Topical Lidocaine for Hair Removal products exist as solids and are only superficially absorbed through intact skin. Eutectic mixtures result in liquids that melt at lower temperatures than their single components. This permits higher concentrations of anesthetics, which results in superior dermal anesthesia for intact skin. Other methods of increasing skin penetration include: chemical drivers, liposomal preparations, iontophoresis, and transdermal patches.

 

Some of the chemical drivers found in many effective topical lidocaine for laser hair removal products include:

 

MSM

Ethoxydiglycol

Propylene glycol

Isopropyl Myristate

Urea

 

Formulations that include drivers and liposomal preparations tend to gain a reputation as the more effective of the topical lidocaine for laser hair removal products.

 

 

It is very important to respect topical lidocaine for laser hair removal products as potent medications that require proper application and adherence to dosing guidelines. When used in overly large dosages, on large surface areas, or applied for long periods of time, especially under occlusive dressing, there is a risk of potentially serious adverse events (bad side effects). This applies to ALL topical lidocaine for laser hair removal products.

 

 

Adverse Effects

 

Adverse effects are usually caused by high plasma concentrations of topical anesthetics that typically result from excessive exposure caused by application to abraded or torn skin.  Possible adverse effects include the following:

  • Burning or stinging may occur local to the administration site.
  • Oral viscous lidocaine may cause systemic toxicity, particularly with repeated use in infants or children.
  • CNS: High plasma concentration initially produces CNS stimulation (including seizures), followed by CNS depression (including respiratory arrest). The CNS stimulatory effect may be absent in some patients, particularly when amides (eg, tetracaine) are administered. Solutions that contain epinephrine may add to the CNS stimulatory effect.
  • Cardiovascular: High plasma levels typically depress the heart and may result in bradycardia, arrhythmias, hypotension, cardiovascular collapse, and cardiac arrest. Local anesthetics that contain epinephrine may cause hypertension, tachycardia, and angina.

 

When used as directed, topical lidocaine for laser hair removal products are well tolerated. Always ensure appropriate use in order to limit the risk of side effects.

 

Safety is important when considering using topical lidocaine for laser hair removal creams. A safety feature built into the NeuroMed Topical Anesthetic products is the packaging in single-use, sanitary packets. This feature eliminates the risk of cross-contamination that would otherwise occur with the use of products contained in multi-use jars and tubes.

 

 

Find out why everyone is raving about NeuroMed Topical Anesthetics! Order yours now! Fast onset, maximum effect, highest concentration of lidocaine allowed by law, clean, sanitary packets, product is always new and fresh. TWO YEAR SHELF LIFE! ORDER YOURS NOW!

 

 

 

Topical lidocaine for laser hair removal

Single-use, sanitary, metered dose packets of NeuroMed 7. Safe and effective topical lidocaine for laser hair removal

 

Get the best alternative to other current topical therapeutics and systemic drugs